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Certificate Recital: Corinna Brueckner, Voice

Presented by Princeton University Music Department

date & time

Sun, May 7, 2023
4:30 pm
- 5:30 pm

  • This event has passed.
poster for Corinna Brueckner's senior recital with a photo of Corinna smiling and sitting on concrete steps under large concrete arches.

Corinna Brueckner ’23 (Voice) performs a senior recital.

Final recital for the Vocal Performance Certificate featuring works by Mozart, Haydn, Massenet, Saint-Saëns, Britten and more.

Featuring: Eric Plutz, piano

W. A. MOZART Se l'augellin sen fugge (from La finta giardiniera)

Dolce d'amor compagne

F. J. HAYDN Wo Liebesgötter lachten (from Der Apotheker)

Es kam ein Pascha aus Türkenland

J. MASSENET Va, laisse couler mes larmes (from Werther)

C. SAINT-SAËNS Mon coeur s'ouvre à ta voix (from Samson et Dalilah)

W. A. MOZART Prenderò quel brunettino (Duet) (from Così fan tutte)

with Katelyn Rodrigues, soprano

J. BRAHMS Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer (from Fünf Lieder (Op. 105))

G. MAHLER Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen (from Rückert Lieder)

B. BRITTEN Cabaret Songs

i. Tell me the truth about love

ii. Funeral blues

iii. Johnny

iv. Calypso

Download PDF Program

By Corinna Brueckner

After reviewing the music performed in this program, it is apt to say that all of the pieces contain one similar theme: love. Whether that be young love, unrequited love, or the existence of love past death, each piece while from various centuries and written in completely different styles center around this emotion that ties together humanity. The first two pieces on the program are rarely performed Mozart arias from his early opera La finta giardiniera (1774), a classic case of disguised identities, forbidden love, and of course, a trouser role. The arias, “Se l’augellin sen fugge” and “Dolce d’amor compagna” are sung by Ramiro, a young man madly in love with Arminda who has rejected him for the Count Belfiore numerous times. However, in both the arias the character shows his determination in winning Arminda’s heart and the pains and joys of unrequited love.

Next are arias from my senior thesis production, Haydn’s Der Apotheker. Originally from the three-act Italian opera, Lo speziale (1768), a German translation and reduction to a one act opera was created in 1895 by musicologist and critic Dr. Robert Hirschfeld. Once again, the themes of unrequited love, swindling opposing suitors and a trouser role (Volpino) are present. The first aria, “Wo Liebesgötter lachten” is in response to Volpino’s rejection by his crush, Grilletta, and the second aria, “Es kam ein Pascha,” is his attempt to send his competition all the way to Turkey and out of the field of opposition.

Transitioning from Germanic composers to those of the French Romantic Era, the aria “Va, laisse couler mes larmes” sung by the character Charlotte in Massenet’s opera Werther (1909) directly opposes Haydn’s jovial musical character. Charlotte speaks with her sister and mourns her inability to be with the man she loves, the young poet Werther. The second French aria comes from Saint-Saëns’ Samson et Dalilah (1877), the Biblical tale of the seductress who manages to deprive the hero Samson of his superhuman strength. The snaking chromatic passages of the sung line alludes to Dalilah’s effect over Samson and her deceit can be heard in the piano in a striking melodic counterpoint.

The next half of the program begins with a wonderful duet from Mozart’s Così fan tutte where the two sisters, Dorabella and Fiordiligi, decide which suitor they will pursue. The following two pieces are by remarkable German composers: “Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer” by Brahms (1886) and “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen” (1901) by Mahler. The former explores the thought of how love continues after death, and the pain at the thought that once we die the person we love may grow to love another. The second could also be considered to be about love, however it is more of a bittersweet goodbye to the world as the narrator’s spirit transcends into their own being.

The final song cycle, Britten’s jaunty Cabaret Songs (1937-1939), could very well also be renamed Love Songs. The poems for the cycle are from W. H. Auden who Britten frequently collaborated after their introduction in 1935. Starting with “Tell me the truth about love” the narrator lists off various virtues and vices that she believes might be associated with finding her love. Perhaps these are all people that she has met and looking back she wonders if those were the character traits she was supposed to love about them? Second, “Funeral Blues” is a lament to the death of the narrator’s true love and epitomizes the wish for the whole world to mourn with her. Next comes “Johnny” which portrays a youthful, naïve view of love where gradually the narrator discovers that perhaps Johnny does not love her quite as much as she loves him. Finally, “Calypso” gives a rousing finish to the cycle depicting the excitement but also perhaps anxiety of being so close to seeing the person you love. As the singer’s melody trails off into the distance the audience is left with the promise of a happy reunion.


Mezzo-soprano Corinna Brueckner is a senior in the German Department receiving a Certificate in Vocal Performance. Recent appearances include her senior thesis, “Reimagining the Revival: The Case for a Contemporary Staging of Haydn’s Der Apotheker” which she produced and sang the role of Volpino. Past roles include Dido from Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas at Princeton University and Mrs. Splinters from Copland’s The Tender Land during Chicago Summer Opera’s 2022 season. She has also participated in prestigious summer programs including CoOPERAtive at Westminster Choir College, SongFest at the Colburn School of Music and the Boston University Tanglewood Institute. This summer she is ecstatic to sing her first roles abroad in Lyric Opera Studio Weimar’s production of Die Zauberflöte as the Dritte Dame and Dritte Knabe. During her time at Princeton, Corinna was a member of David Kellett’s studio and will continue her studies with him in the coming year. She was involved in numerous musical groups including the Princeton University Glee Club under the direction of Gabriel Crouch, Chamber Choir, Decem, and founded in her junior year Princeton’s first Opera Scenes Club with support from the Glee Club and directed by David Kellett.

Organist and pianist Eric Plutz is University Organist at Princeton University, where his responsibilities include playing for weekly services at the Chapel, Academic Ceremonies, and solo concerts, as well as accompanying the University Chapel Choir in services and concerts. He coordinates the weekly After Noon Concert Series at the University Chapel, is Lecturer in Music and Instructor of Organ at Princeton University, and maintains a private studio. Also in Princeton, Mr. Plutz is rehearsal accompanist for Princeton Pro Musica. In 2016 Mr. Plutz received the Alumni Merit Award from Westminster Choir College of Rider University. Originally from Rock Island, Illinois, Mr. Plutz earned a Bachelor of Music degree, magna cum laude, from Westminster Choir College and a Master of Music degree from the Eastman School of Music.


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By Corinna Brueckner

After reviewing the music performed in this program, it is apt to say that all of the pieces contain one similar theme: love. Whether that be young love, unrequited love, or the existence of love past death, each piece while from various centuries and written in completely different styles center around this emotion that ties together humanity. The first two pieces on the program are rarely performed Mozart arias from his early opera La finta giardiniera (1774), a classic case of disguised identities, forbidden love, and of course, a trouser role. The arias, “Se l’augellin sen fugge” and “Dolce d’amor compagna” are sung by Ramiro, a young man madly in love with Arminda who has rejected him for the Count Belfiore numerous times. However, in both the arias the character shows his determination in winning Arminda’s heart and the pains and joys of unrequited love.

Next are arias from my senior thesis production, Haydn’s Der Apotheker. Originally from the three-act Italian opera, Lo speziale (1768), a German translation and reduction to a one act opera was created in 1895 by musicologist and critic Dr. Robert Hirschfeld. Once again, the themes of unrequited love, swindling opposing suitors and a trouser role (Volpino) are present. The first aria, “Wo Liebesgötter lachten” is in response to Volpino’s rejection by his crush, Grilletta, and the second aria, “Es kam ein Pascha,” is his attempt to send his competition all the way to Turkey and out of the field of opposition.

Transitioning from Germanic composers to those of the French Romantic Era, the aria “Va, laisse couler mes larmes” sung by the character Charlotte in Massenet’s opera Werther (1909) directly opposes Haydn’s jovial musical character. Charlotte speaks with her sister and mourns her inability to be with the man she loves, the young poet Werther. The second French aria comes from Saint-Saëns’ Samson et Dalilah (1877), the Biblical tale of the seductress who manages to deprive the hero Samson of his superhuman strength. The snaking chromatic passages of the sung line alludes to Dalilah’s effect over Samson and her deceit can be heard in the piano in a striking melodic counterpoint.

The next half of the program begins with a wonderful duet from Mozart’s Così fan tutte where the two sisters, Dorabella and Fiordiligi, decide which suitor they will pursue. The following two pieces are by remarkable German composers: “Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer” by Brahms (1886) and “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen” (1901) by Mahler. The former explores the thought of how love continues after death, and the pain at the thought that once we die the person we love may grow to love another. The second could also be considered to be about love, however it is more of a bittersweet goodbye to the world as the narrator’s spirit transcends into their own being.

The final song cycle, Britten’s jaunty Cabaret Songs (1937-1939), could very well also be renamed Love Songs. The poems for the cycle are from W. H. Auden who Britten frequently collaborated after their introduction in 1935. Starting with “Tell me the truth about love” the narrator lists off various virtues and vices that she believes might be associated with finding her love. Perhaps these are all people that she has met and looking back she wonders if those were the character traits she was supposed to love about them? Second, “Funeral Blues” is a lament to the death of the narrator’s true love and epitomizes the wish for the whole world to mourn with her. Next comes “Johnny” which portrays a youthful, naïve view of love where gradually the narrator discovers that perhaps Johnny does not love her quite as much as she loves him. Finally, “Calypso” gives a rousing finish to the cycle depicting the excitement but also perhaps anxiety of being so close to seeing the person you love. As the singer’s melody trails off into the distance the audience is left with the promise of a happy reunion.


Mezzo-soprano Corinna Brueckner is a senior in the German Department receiving a Certificate in Vocal Performance. Recent appearances include her senior thesis, “Reimagining the Revival: The Case for a Contemporary Staging of Haydn’s Der Apotheker” which she produced and sang the role of Volpino. Past roles include Dido from Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas at Princeton University and Mrs. Splinters from Copland’s The Tender Land during Chicago Summer Opera’s 2022 season. She has also participated in prestigious summer programs including CoOPERAtive at Westminster Choir College, SongFest at the Colburn School of Music and the Boston University Tanglewood Institute. This summer she is ecstatic to sing her first roles abroad in Lyric Opera Studio Weimar’s production of Die Zauberflöte as the Dritte Dame and Dritte Knabe. During her time at Princeton, Corinna was a member of David Kellett’s studio and will continue her studies with him in the coming year. She was involved in numerous musical groups including the Princeton University Glee Club under the direction of Gabriel Crouch, Chamber Choir, Decem, and founded in her junior year Princeton’s first Opera Scenes Club with support from the Glee Club and directed by David Kellett.

Organist and pianist Eric Plutz is University Organist at Princeton University, where his responsibilities include playing for weekly services at the Chapel, Academic Ceremonies, and solo concerts, as well as accompanying the University Chapel Choir in services and concerts. He coordinates the weekly After Noon Concert Series at the University Chapel, is Lecturer in Music and Instructor of Organ at Princeton University, and maintains a private studio. Also in Princeton, Mr. Plutz is rehearsal accompanist for Princeton Pro Musica. In 2016 Mr. Plutz received the Alumni Merit Award from Westminster Choir College of Rider University. Originally from Rock Island, Illinois, Mr. Plutz earned a Bachelor of Music degree, magna cum laude, from Westminster Choir College and a Master of Music degree from the Eastman School of Music.


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