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Certificate Recital: Taylor Akin, Bassoon

Presented by Princeton University Music Department

date & time

Fri, Apr 7, 2023
6:00 pm
- 7:00 pm

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poster with gray patterned background with cartoon/avatar image of Taylor with text that reads "Taylor Akin Senior 2023 Recital." Read the description for more information.

Taylor Akin ’23 (Bassoon) performs a senior recital.

Featuring:
Kristin Cahill | Piano/Harpsichord
Nina Shih ’24 | Violin
Jeremy Cha ’23 | Cello
Albert Zhou ’24 | Viola
Ewan Curtis ’23 | Double Bass

Georg Philipp Telemann Sonata in F Minor (Taylor Akin '23, Bassoon; Kristin Cahill, Harpsichord; Ewan Curtis '23, Double Bass)

Adolphus Hailstork Bassoon Set for Solo Bassoon (Taylor Akin '23, Bassoon)

Daniel Baldwin River Of Light (Taylor Akin '23, Bassoon; Kristin Cahill, Piano)

John Steinmetz Sonata for Bassoon and Piano (Taylor Akin '23, Bassoon; Kristin Cahill, Piano)

W.A. Mozart, Arr. Mordechai Rechtman Quartett In G-Dur für Fagott, Violine, Viola, Und Violoncello, KV 285 (Taylor Akin '23, Bassoon; Nina Shih '24, Violin; Albert Zhou '24, Viola; Jeremy Cha '23, Cello)

Download PDF Program

By: Taylor Akin

Sonata in F Minor (Telemann, 1728)
The Telemann Sonata in F minor for Bassoon is a masterpiece of Baroque music
that showcases the beauty and expressiveness of the bassoon. Composed by
Georg Philipp Telemann, one of the most prolific and influential composers of the
Baroque period, this sonata is a true gem of the bassoon repertoire. It is quite
special to me, as it is the very first solo work I prepared on bassoon (which, looking
back, was absolutely absurd). It feels fitting that my days of music making in
conjunction with (or in lieu of) my academic involvement not only begin, but come
to an end with the same notes.

This sonata is intended to be performed with accompaniment, typically by cello or
harpsichord. In this performance, I have the pleasure of performing it with both
double bass accompaniment by fellow member of the Great Class of 2023, Ewan
Curtis and harpsichord accompaniment by the talented Kristin Cahill. The first
movement, marked “Triste,” opens with a slow, melancholy melody played by the
bassoon. The bassoon’s rich, warm tone is well-suited to the melancholic mood of
this movement. The second movement, marked “Allegro,” is a lively and energetic
dance. The bassoon and continuo play off each other in a playful and joyful
manner. The third movement, marked “Andante,” is a slow, stately dance in
compound meter. The final movement, marked “Vivace,” is a fast and lively dance
that brings the sonata to a thrilling conclusion.

Bassoon Set for Solo Bassoon (Hailstork, 1996)
Adolphus Hailstork is a highly respected contemporary composer who has written
for a wide range of genres and ensembles, including opera, orchestra, and
chamber music. His works have been performed by renowned ensembles such as
the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and Detroit
Symphony Orchestra. The “Bassoon Set” is a solo piece for bassoon that explores
the unique and versatile voice of the instrument. The four movements showcase
the bassoon’s range and virtuosity, from the quirky and confident character of the
first movement to the whirlwind of technical passages in the second movement.
The third movement features a beautiful and melancholic melody that showcases
the bassoon’s rich and expressive capabilities. The fourth movement concludes the
piece with a sinister statement, with the bassoon’s dynamic and expressive
capabilities taking center stage once again. Despite being a solo piece, Hailstork’s
skillful composition creates a rich and complex soundscape that is engaging and
dynamic.

River of Light (Baldwin, 2008)
“River of Light” is a stunning piece by composer Daniel Baldwin that has taken on a
rich and meaningful life since its composition in 2008. As a native of Oklahoma,
Baldwin’s work is of particular significance to me, as he attended high school with
the very band director who inspired my own journey with the bassoon. This
beautiful piece is inspired by Frederick Edwin Church’s painting “El Rio de Luz,”
which draws inspiration from a variety of South American scenes. Baldwin’s skillful
composition captures the beauty and majesty of the painting, with flowing
melodies and lush harmonies that transport the listener to a world of light and
color.

The piece parallels the cycle of life in an incredibly beautiful way. The piece starts
beautifully serene with the piano acting as the beginning of life – first breaths being
drawn and eyes seeing light for the first time. Then we watch the development of
an awareness of the beauty within the world, unfolding before our eyes. The
middle section shares a glimpse of the excitement brought on by the beauty of
God’s world enveloping us as we grow. Then finally, we reach the end –
contemplative and serene. Full of gratitude and love, the bassoon and piano join
each other as old friends in the final stages of life. Finally, we are whisked away as
the bassoon and piano take one final breath together and conclude a wonderfully
fulfilling life together. I hope you enjoy listening to this piece, and I encourage you
to enjoy the painting that inspired it below, considering it as you listen.

Sonata for Bassoon and Piano (Steinmetz, 1981)
“Sonata for Bassoon and Piano” is a stunningly beautiful and moving three
movement work. It strikes an incredible balance between dark and raw, while also
exhibiting beauty and color. I have had the pleasure of discovering John
Steinmetz’s music, and it has brought me great joy. My first encounter was with his
“Suite from an Imaginary Opera,” a challenging yet rewarding work that allowed me
to explore his unique musical language. Steinmetz is truly a rare composer of
instrumental music who continues to create engaging and innovative works in
contemporary times. I’ll leave the description of the piece up to Steinmetz himself,
citing part of his notes on the piece.

This Sonata is not in “sonata form”. Like very early sonatas, it is music “to be
sounded,” music for invoking different emotional states. The first movement
portrays the bassoon as a strong voiced instrument exploring powerful feelings.
The second movement is based on an English tune called “Browning” (or “The
Leaves Be Green.”) Several English Renaissance composers made consort
settings of this tune; I was inspired by (and stole ideas from) the Browning for
three viols by Elway Bevin, in which the 8-bar theme constantly repeats, moving
to a different instrument each time. My version has four voices, with three played
by the pianist. – John Steinmetz

Quartett In G-Dur für Fagott, Violine, Viola, Und
Violoncello, KV 285 (Mozart, 1777)
The Quartett für Flöte, Violine, Viola, Und Violoncello, KV 285, is one of Mozart’s
most beloved chamber works, composed in 1777. The piece features a light and
elegant character that is quintessentially Mozartian, and is a shining example of his
mastery of classical chamber music. We, however, will be performing a
transcription for bassoon, violin, viola, and cello by Mordechai Rechtman.
The first movement, marked “Allegro,” opens with a lively theme introduced by the
bassoon, which is then passed on to the strings. The second movement, marked
“Adagio,” is a tender and introspective meditation that showcases Mozart’s gift for
lyrical expression. The final movement, marked “Rondeau,” is a joyous and playful
romp that brings the work to a delightful close.

Overall, the Bassoon Quartet in D major, K.285, is a work of great charm and
elegance that displays Mozart’s genius for melody, form, and instrumental color.
I’m delighted to be performing three wonderful movements with three wonderful
people; two of whom I had the pleasure of getting to know during our semester at
the Royal College of Music: Nina Shih (violin) and Albert Zhou (viola). Additionally,
it is a pleasure to make music with a fellow member of the Great Class of 2023,
Jeremy Cha (cello).


Taylor Akin ’23 is a member of the Great Class of 2023 at Princeton University
from Washington, Oklahoma. He is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Computer
Science with a certificate in Music Performance on the bassoon. With a musical
background spanning over a decade, Taylor has excelled in both saxophone and
bassoon, studying under the esteemed Professor Rod Ackmann from 2014 to
2019.

Taylor’s musical achievements include performing on NPR’s From the Top in 2018
and collaborating with Kevin Olusola, the beatboxer of the popular group
Pentatonix, on episode 4 of Where Music Lives in 2019. He has been fortunate to
perform in Carnegie Hall’s Honor Performance Series, in the Advanced Double
Reed Institute of Texas, and at Tanglewood Institute. He has also participated in the
Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute at Quartz Mountain from 2017 to 2019.
At Princeton, Taylor is a part of the Princeton University Orchestra and studies with
Robert Wagner, principal bassoonist of the New Jersey Symphony. Additionally, he
spent Fall 2022 studying at the Royal College of Music in London. Outside of
music, he is a Peer Academic Advisor, a Global Ambassador, and a member of
Princeton Christian Fellowship and The Aquinas Institute. After graduation, he plans
to build his career as a software developer and an entrepreneur.

Kristin Cahill is on the faculty at the New School for Music Study. She holds a
Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance from Bowling Green State University and
a Master of Music in Piano Performance with additional studies in Collaborative
Piano from the University of Houston. From 2008-2013, Ms. Cahill lived in
Barcelona, Spain, where she extensively studied castanets and Spanish piano
repertoire.

An active adjudicator, Ms. Cahill is a member of the Royal Conservatory of Music
College of Examiners. In addition, she has published articles in The Piano Magazine
and has presented at the MTNA National Conference, and The Piano Conference.

Ewan Curtis ’23 is a senior from Houston, Texas concentrating in Computer
Science and pursuing certificates in Urban Studies and Music Performance in
Double Bass. He began playing the bass in sixth grade and immediately loved it. In
high school, he studied with Eric Larson and he now studies with Jack Hill. At
Princeton, Ewan plays double bass in the Princeton University Orchestra and
electric bass in the Princeton University Rock Ensemble. He thoroughly enjoys
playing music with friends outside of these ensembles as well. He has played in a
number of student bands on campus, and loves to play any piano or guitar he
manages to find. Recently, he’s started to learn to DJ, and is having a blast
performing for friends. When he isn’t playing music or doing schoolwork, Ewan can
be found cycling, hiking, skiing, snowboarding, or exploring the local public
transportation system.

Nina Shih ’24 is a junior from Lancaster, PA who studies violin with Anna Lim and is
concentrating in History. She began playing the violin at the age of 3 and has
enjoyed performing at the Kennedy Center, the Vanderbilt University Blair School
of Music, and the Candlelight Concert Series with the Peabody Pre-Conservatory
Violin Program. Independently, she has participated in masterclasses with violinists
such as Midori Goto and Kristof Barati and has opened a concert at the Mount
Gretna Music series for Rachel Barton Pine. She spent the fall of her junior year
studying abroad at the Royal College of Music in London and is planning on
getting a certificate in Music Performance. Outside of violin, Nina loves to eat, read,
paint, write, and sing, and is planning on pursuing a career in law.

Albert Zhou ’24 began playing viola at the age of fourteen following nine years of
violin studies. As an avid chamber musician, Albert was the violist of the Meridiem
Quartet, which won the bronze medal in the 2019 PCM National Chamber Music
Competition, and has participated in several summers of chamber music
intensives. He has also enjoyed two summers at Interlochen performing in the
World Youth Symphony Orchestra as principal viola. More recently, Albert spent a
term studying at the Royal College of Music where he performed with the RCM
Symphony and Philharmonic orchestras. Albert currently studies viola with Jessica
Thompson at Princeton University. Past teachers include Aimée Kreston, Andrew
Picken, and Nathan Braude.

At Princeton, Albert is concentrating in molecular biology and pursuing a certificate
in music performance. He is active in Princeton’s music community as a member
of the Princeton University Orchestra and Opus Chamber Music, and as a
volunteer teacher with the Trenton Youth Orchestra. Albert also works at the
Mendel Music Library. In his free time, Albert enjoys shoddily sight-reading music,
taking long walks around campus, and entertaining various whimsical and shortlived obsessions.

Jeremy Cha ’23 is a senior from Westfield, New Jersey majoring in molecular
biology with a certificate in music performance. At Princeton, Jeremy has been a
member of the Princeton University Orchestra, Opus, La Vie en Cello, and Early
Music Princeton. Besides music, Jeremy is also an avid fan of basketball and good
naps.


I wouldn’t be here today without the love and support from Mandy Akin (my wife),
Mark and Deanna Akin (my parents), Robert Wagner (my current bassoon
teacher), Rodney Ackmann (my former bassoon teacher) and my friends here at
Princeton. I would first like to thank my parents for being so supportive of my quest
toward music making for so long. They financed my life as a musician (which, as a
bassoonist, was no easy feat) and made sure I had what I needed to excel. Second,
I’d like to thank my wife for putting up with me and supporting me for the past 8
years. I’m so appreciative for your unconditional support, listening to or attending
nearly every concert, joining me in London at the RCM, and for your help getting
to this point tonight – thank you. A big thank you to Mr. Robert Wagner, my
bassoon teacher for the past four years. I couldn’t have done this amidst the
Princeton curriculum without your understanding and continual encouragement.
Additionally, I’d be remiss if I didn’t also mention my gratitude for my first bassoon
instructor, Rod Ackmann. I am so thankful for the direction and the foundation that
he gave me while I was studying with him. Finally, I would like to thank my friends,
especially those joining me on this recital. Nina, Albert, Jeremy, Ewan, Jack, Selena,
Andra, and so many others. My musical journey has been enhanced by your
company, and I really appreciate getting to know you all over the course of my
time at Princeton. I would like to conclude by thanking Kristin Cahill and the
members of the quartet for the many hours of rehearsing and practice – you all
helped to bring this musical showcase to life. But most of all, thank you (yes, you
reading this!) for coming and supporting me as I close out my musical journey.
Music is meaningless without people to share it with, so thank you for allowing me
to share it with you.


Similar Events


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By: Taylor Akin

Sonata in F Minor (Telemann, 1728)
The Telemann Sonata in F minor for Bassoon is a masterpiece of Baroque music
that showcases the beauty and expressiveness of the bassoon. Composed by
Georg Philipp Telemann, one of the most prolific and influential composers of the
Baroque period, this sonata is a true gem of the bassoon repertoire. It is quite
special to me, as it is the very first solo work I prepared on bassoon (which, looking
back, was absolutely absurd). It feels fitting that my days of music making in
conjunction with (or in lieu of) my academic involvement not only begin, but come
to an end with the same notes.

This sonata is intended to be performed with accompaniment, typically by cello or
harpsichord. In this performance, I have the pleasure of performing it with both
double bass accompaniment by fellow member of the Great Class of 2023, Ewan
Curtis and harpsichord accompaniment by the talented Kristin Cahill. The first
movement, marked “Triste,” opens with a slow, melancholy melody played by the
bassoon. The bassoon’s rich, warm tone is well-suited to the melancholic mood of
this movement. The second movement, marked “Allegro,” is a lively and energetic
dance. The bassoon and continuo play off each other in a playful and joyful
manner. The third movement, marked “Andante,” is a slow, stately dance in
compound meter. The final movement, marked “Vivace,” is a fast and lively dance
that brings the sonata to a thrilling conclusion.

Bassoon Set for Solo Bassoon (Hailstork, 1996)
Adolphus Hailstork is a highly respected contemporary composer who has written
for a wide range of genres and ensembles, including opera, orchestra, and
chamber music. His works have been performed by renowned ensembles such as
the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and Detroit
Symphony Orchestra. The “Bassoon Set” is a solo piece for bassoon that explores
the unique and versatile voice of the instrument. The four movements showcase
the bassoon’s range and virtuosity, from the quirky and confident character of the
first movement to the whirlwind of technical passages in the second movement.
The third movement features a beautiful and melancholic melody that showcases
the bassoon’s rich and expressive capabilities. The fourth movement concludes the
piece with a sinister statement, with the bassoon’s dynamic and expressive
capabilities taking center stage once again. Despite being a solo piece, Hailstork’s
skillful composition creates a rich and complex soundscape that is engaging and
dynamic.

River of Light (Baldwin, 2008)
“River of Light” is a stunning piece by composer Daniel Baldwin that has taken on a
rich and meaningful life since its composition in 2008. As a native of Oklahoma,
Baldwin’s work is of particular significance to me, as he attended high school with
the very band director who inspired my own journey with the bassoon. This
beautiful piece is inspired by Frederick Edwin Church’s painting “El Rio de Luz,”
which draws inspiration from a variety of South American scenes. Baldwin’s skillful
composition captures the beauty and majesty of the painting, with flowing
melodies and lush harmonies that transport the listener to a world of light and
color.

The piece parallels the cycle of life in an incredibly beautiful way. The piece starts
beautifully serene with the piano acting as the beginning of life – first breaths being
drawn and eyes seeing light for the first time. Then we watch the development of
an awareness of the beauty within the world, unfolding before our eyes. The
middle section shares a glimpse of the excitement brought on by the beauty of
God’s world enveloping us as we grow. Then finally, we reach the end –
contemplative and serene. Full of gratitude and love, the bassoon and piano join
each other as old friends in the final stages of life. Finally, we are whisked away as
the bassoon and piano take one final breath together and conclude a wonderfully
fulfilling life together. I hope you enjoy listening to this piece, and I encourage you
to enjoy the painting that inspired it below, considering it as you listen.

Sonata for Bassoon and Piano (Steinmetz, 1981)
“Sonata for Bassoon and Piano” is a stunningly beautiful and moving three
movement work. It strikes an incredible balance between dark and raw, while also
exhibiting beauty and color. I have had the pleasure of discovering John
Steinmetz’s music, and it has brought me great joy. My first encounter was with his
“Suite from an Imaginary Opera,” a challenging yet rewarding work that allowed me
to explore his unique musical language. Steinmetz is truly a rare composer of
instrumental music who continues to create engaging and innovative works in
contemporary times. I’ll leave the description of the piece up to Steinmetz himself,
citing part of his notes on the piece.

This Sonata is not in “sonata form”. Like very early sonatas, it is music “to be
sounded,” music for invoking different emotional states. The first movement
portrays the bassoon as a strong voiced instrument exploring powerful feelings.
The second movement is based on an English tune called “Browning” (or “The
Leaves Be Green.”) Several English Renaissance composers made consort
settings of this tune; I was inspired by (and stole ideas from) the Browning for
three viols by Elway Bevin, in which the 8-bar theme constantly repeats, moving
to a different instrument each time. My version has four voices, with three played
by the pianist. – John Steinmetz

Quartett In G-Dur für Fagott, Violine, Viola, Und
Violoncello, KV 285 (Mozart, 1777)
The Quartett für Flöte, Violine, Viola, Und Violoncello, KV 285, is one of Mozart’s
most beloved chamber works, composed in 1777. The piece features a light and
elegant character that is quintessentially Mozartian, and is a shining example of his
mastery of classical chamber music. We, however, will be performing a
transcription for bassoon, violin, viola, and cello by Mordechai Rechtman.
The first movement, marked “Allegro,” opens with a lively theme introduced by the
bassoon, which is then passed on to the strings. The second movement, marked
“Adagio,” is a tender and introspective meditation that showcases Mozart’s gift for
lyrical expression. The final movement, marked “Rondeau,” is a joyous and playful
romp that brings the work to a delightful close.

Overall, the Bassoon Quartet in D major, K.285, is a work of great charm and
elegance that displays Mozart’s genius for melody, form, and instrumental color.
I’m delighted to be performing three wonderful movements with three wonderful
people; two of whom I had the pleasure of getting to know during our semester at
the Royal College of Music: Nina Shih (violin) and Albert Zhou (viola). Additionally,
it is a pleasure to make music with a fellow member of the Great Class of 2023,
Jeremy Cha (cello).


Taylor Akin ’23 is a member of the Great Class of 2023 at Princeton University
from Washington, Oklahoma. He is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Computer
Science with a certificate in Music Performance on the bassoon. With a musical
background spanning over a decade, Taylor has excelled in both saxophone and
bassoon, studying under the esteemed Professor Rod Ackmann from 2014 to
2019.

Taylor’s musical achievements include performing on NPR’s From the Top in 2018
and collaborating with Kevin Olusola, the beatboxer of the popular group
Pentatonix, on episode 4 of Where Music Lives in 2019. He has been fortunate to
perform in Carnegie Hall’s Honor Performance Series, in the Advanced Double
Reed Institute of Texas, and at Tanglewood Institute. He has also participated in the
Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute at Quartz Mountain from 2017 to 2019.
At Princeton, Taylor is a part of the Princeton University Orchestra and studies with
Robert Wagner, principal bassoonist of the New Jersey Symphony. Additionally, he
spent Fall 2022 studying at the Royal College of Music in London. Outside of
music, he is a Peer Academic Advisor, a Global Ambassador, and a member of
Princeton Christian Fellowship and The Aquinas Institute. After graduation, he plans
to build his career as a software developer and an entrepreneur.

Kristin Cahill is on the faculty at the New School for Music Study. She holds a
Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance from Bowling Green State University and
a Master of Music in Piano Performance with additional studies in Collaborative
Piano from the University of Houston. From 2008-2013, Ms. Cahill lived in
Barcelona, Spain, where she extensively studied castanets and Spanish piano
repertoire.

An active adjudicator, Ms. Cahill is a member of the Royal Conservatory of Music
College of Examiners. In addition, she has published articles in The Piano Magazine
and has presented at the MTNA National Conference, and The Piano Conference.

Ewan Curtis ’23 is a senior from Houston, Texas concentrating in Computer
Science and pursuing certificates in Urban Studies and Music Performance in
Double Bass. He began playing the bass in sixth grade and immediately loved it. In
high school, he studied with Eric Larson and he now studies with Jack Hill. At
Princeton, Ewan plays double bass in the Princeton University Orchestra and
electric bass in the Princeton University Rock Ensemble. He thoroughly enjoys
playing music with friends outside of these ensembles as well. He has played in a
number of student bands on campus, and loves to play any piano or guitar he
manages to find. Recently, he’s started to learn to DJ, and is having a blast
performing for friends. When he isn’t playing music or doing schoolwork, Ewan can
be found cycling, hiking, skiing, snowboarding, or exploring the local public
transportation system.

Nina Shih ’24 is a junior from Lancaster, PA who studies violin with Anna Lim and is
concentrating in History. She began playing the violin at the age of 3 and has
enjoyed performing at the Kennedy Center, the Vanderbilt University Blair School
of Music, and the Candlelight Concert Series with the Peabody Pre-Conservatory
Violin Program. Independently, she has participated in masterclasses with violinists
such as Midori Goto and Kristof Barati and has opened a concert at the Mount
Gretna Music series for Rachel Barton Pine. She spent the fall of her junior year
studying abroad at the Royal College of Music in London and is planning on
getting a certificate in Music Performance. Outside of violin, Nina loves to eat, read,
paint, write, and sing, and is planning on pursuing a career in law.

Albert Zhou ’24 began playing viola at the age of fourteen following nine years of
violin studies. As an avid chamber musician, Albert was the violist of the Meridiem
Quartet, which won the bronze medal in the 2019 PCM National Chamber Music
Competition, and has participated in several summers of chamber music
intensives. He has also enjoyed two summers at Interlochen performing in the
World Youth Symphony Orchestra as principal viola. More recently, Albert spent a
term studying at the Royal College of Music where he performed with the RCM
Symphony and Philharmonic orchestras. Albert currently studies viola with Jessica
Thompson at Princeton University. Past teachers include Aimée Kreston, Andrew
Picken, and Nathan Braude.

At Princeton, Albert is concentrating in molecular biology and pursuing a certificate
in music performance. He is active in Princeton’s music community as a member
of the Princeton University Orchestra and Opus Chamber Music, and as a
volunteer teacher with the Trenton Youth Orchestra. Albert also works at the
Mendel Music Library. In his free time, Albert enjoys shoddily sight-reading music,
taking long walks around campus, and entertaining various whimsical and shortlived obsessions.

Jeremy Cha ’23 is a senior from Westfield, New Jersey majoring in molecular
biology with a certificate in music performance. At Princeton, Jeremy has been a
member of the Princeton University Orchestra, Opus, La Vie en Cello, and Early
Music Princeton. Besides music, Jeremy is also an avid fan of basketball and good
naps.


I wouldn’t be here today without the love and support from Mandy Akin (my wife),
Mark and Deanna Akin (my parents), Robert Wagner (my current bassoon
teacher), Rodney Ackmann (my former bassoon teacher) and my friends here at
Princeton. I would first like to thank my parents for being so supportive of my quest
toward music making for so long. They financed my life as a musician (which, as a
bassoonist, was no easy feat) and made sure I had what I needed to excel. Second,
I’d like to thank my wife for putting up with me and supporting me for the past 8
years. I’m so appreciative for your unconditional support, listening to or attending
nearly every concert, joining me in London at the RCM, and for your help getting
to this point tonight – thank you. A big thank you to Mr. Robert Wagner, my
bassoon teacher for the past four years. I couldn’t have done this amidst the
Princeton curriculum without your understanding and continual encouragement.
Additionally, I’d be remiss if I didn’t also mention my gratitude for my first bassoon
instructor, Rod Ackmann. I am so thankful for the direction and the foundation that
he gave me while I was studying with him. Finally, I would like to thank my friends,
especially those joining me on this recital. Nina, Albert, Jeremy, Ewan, Jack, Selena,
Andra, and so many others. My musical journey has been enhanced by your
company, and I really appreciate getting to know you all over the course of my
time at Princeton. I would like to conclude by thanking Kristin Cahill and the
members of the quartet for the many hours of rehearsing and practice – you all
helped to bring this musical showcase to life. But most of all, thank you (yes, you
reading this!) for coming and supporting me as I close out my musical journey.
Music is meaningless without people to share it with, so thank you for allowing me
to share it with you.


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